Lyceum, 1831

Lyceum-h.jpg

Title

Lyceum, 1831

Subject

University of Alabama

Description

The Lyceum, built in 1831, was one of the original buildings at the University of Alabama that was burned during the Civil War. The building was designed by English-born architect William Nichols.

The Old Quad was rectangular and designed along a north-south axis. By the time of the university's destruction in 1865, the quadrangle featured the Lyceum at the center of the northern side, the 70-foot wide, 70-foot high Rotunda at the very center of the quadrangle, and the President's Mansion at the center of the southern side. A primary lane ran from the Lyceum in the north, circled the rotunda, and continued on to the President's Mansion in the south. Lining this lane between the Lyceum and Rotunda were six dormitories, three on each side. Another lane ran east to west in front of the Lyceum. To the west of the Lyceum were at least two faculty houses and the Gorgas House, then used as a dining hall. To the east was a faculty house and, at some distance away from the Quad, the Alabama Corps of Cadets gunpowder magazine.

The Lyceum was a two-story brick building with an Ionic portico, very similar in design to the Lyceum that Nichols built several years later at the University of Mississippi..

Clark Hall was constructed in 1884 on the site of the Lyceum and a silver 1821 dime from the cornerstone of the Lyceum dorm and other items were placed in its cornerstone.

Creator

Union Furniture Company

Source

Union Furniture Company

Publisher

Union Furniture Company

Date

1995

Contributor

Tuscaloosa Public Library
Betty Slowe (Description)

Type

Drawing

Identifier

1062

Coverage

Tuscaloosa (AL)

Original Format

Drawing

Physical Dimensions

8.5 inches x 11 inches

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